Kathryn N. Karam

Recent Posts

What Does the Supreme Court DACA Decision Mean?

Posted on June 19, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

 

On June 18, 2020, the Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration’s effort to end the DACA program, an Obama-era immigration program that offers legal protections to young immigrants brought to the United States as children. You might be asking yourself, what does the supreme court DACA decision mean?

Immigration Lawyer: Do I Qualify for Unemployment and Covid 19 Stimulus Payments?

Posted on April 24, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

We’ve had so many questions from people wanting to hear from an immigration lawyer in Houston about   unemployment benefits and stimulus payments during the Covid-19 pandemic. Here's the answer to your question, from an immigration lawyer: Do I qualify for unemployment and Covid 19 Stimulus Payments?

U.S. tax law is as complicated as U.S. immigration law, so we cannot provide any specific legal advice to you in this blog, but we can provide some general information that may help you understand if you can cash a stimulus check without an issue or claim unemployment benefits.

Can I Apply for Immigration Status During the Coronavirus Outbreak?

Posted on March 31, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

We totally understand if you’re wondering whether you can apply for immigration status during the Coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. You might also be wondering if you can change or extend your status. There have been announcements by USCIS about postponing interviews and biometrics appointments and suspending premium processing of work visa petitions, immigration courts postponing non-detained case hearings, and suspension of visa processing at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

Do I Need to Go to Immigration During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Posted on March 27, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

Updated April 9th, 2020

Various government offices including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and the Executive Office of Immigration Review (the network of immigration courts) each announced in the last week that certain in-person appointments and court hearings would be rescheduled in order to prevent people gathering and potentially spreading the Coronavirus. USCIS just sent out an announcement that it would extend these closures through May 3, 2020, and it may extend the closures longer if needed.  If you’re thinking of applying for immigration benefits in the U.S., you might be wondering if you need to go to immigration during the coronavirus pandemic.

Will Coronavirus Affect my Immigration Case?

Posted on March 19, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

In the last two weeks, our awareness of the Covid-19, or Coronavirus, has greatly increased. Private businesses and government offices are taking steps to avoid “community spread” of the virus – spreading the virus between individuals who are in close proximity to each other. Some immigrants may be wondering, will coronavirus affect my immigration case?

Immigration courts and USCIS offices are places where many people often gather in close quarters, but the government’s response to concerns about the risks of attending immigration court hearings and appointments has been uneven. Here’s what you need to know if you have an immigration application pending or a case in immigration court: 

Immigration Lawyer in Houston Public Charge Rule Update

Posted on February 03, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

 

If you follow changes in immigration law and policy, you’ve been hearing a lot about the Department of Homeland Security’s “public charge rule," more scrutiny, and increased denials of applications.  If you’re worried, you’ve got reason to be. On Monday, January 27, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court granted the Trump administration’s request for a stay of the nationwide injunction against public charge rule. This decision clears the way for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)  to implement the rule in all 50 states except in Illinois, which has a statewide injunction of its own. As an immigration lawyer in Houston, the Public Charge Rule has been on my radar, here's some more information I put together for you.

I Had a Conditional Green Card but I Divorced and Remarried

Posted on January 27, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

 

Marriages don’t always work out – we all know that. It’s hard enough sorting out your differences in the process of divorce. If you add immigration issues on top of marriage issues, things can get even more complicated. The good news is if you get divorced when you’re under a conditional green card and then remarry, there’s a recent development that may make life a little easier.

Are USCIS Filing Fees Going Up in 2020?

Posted on January 07, 2020 by Kathryn N. Karam

 

You may have read that USCIS Filing Fees are going up in 2020.  We can confirm that in November 2019, an announcement was issued that the USCIS Filing Fees were going up. For some applications, the filing fee would increase less than $100. For other applications, the filing fee would increase by over $500.

These filing fee increases affect people applying for citizenship, people applying for green cards, and some people filing for temporary visas.

I Never Filed to Remove Conditions on My Green Card

Posted on July 29, 2019 by Kathryn N. Karam

You received a 2-year conditional green card, but then you let the deadline to file your I-751 Petition to Remove Conditions on your green card. Maybe you just didn’t realize it was that important, or maybe you forgot when it was expiring.  Or maybe you thought you’d have to get your spouse to sign the paperwork, and you’re having marital problems and aren’t sure if that will happen. If you're searching for answers and saying to yourself, I never filed to remove conditions on my green card, this article is for you.

ICE Raids for Deportation Orders in Houston

Posted on June 25, 2019 by Kathryn N. Karam

 

As an immigration lawyer in Houston, I have been asked several questions regarding the latest news on ICE Raids for Deportation Orders. I want to be sure that you have information about what you can do if you are concerned about friends, loved ones, or yourself.

The raids were supposed to take place Sunday, June 23rd, but were later delayed for two weeks. In tweets on June 22nd and 23rd, President Trump stated that the raids are targeted toward people who are subject to deportation orders but are not in custody – they live among in the general public.

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