Can I Get Arrested If I File for a Marriage Based Green Card?

Posted on April 05, 2018 by Kathryn Karam

 

If you and your spouse are thinking of filing a marriage-based immigration case, you might be wondering if you could be arrested after the case is filed. Now that Texas SB4 has been largely upheld by the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, local law enforcement officers may question a person’s immigration status. In addition, there have been isolated incidents in the Houston area of ICE officers going to homes after becoming aware that a person whose status has expired or who is suspected to be in the country without authorization. With all of this happening, it’s understandable that people are afraid of ICE showing up to arrest them after they file an immigration petition.

How Do I Show My Marriage Is Real in a Marriage Based Immigration Petition?

Posted on March 22, 2018 by Kimberley Marie Hudson

How do I show my marriage is real in a marriage based immigration petition? A United States citizen or Permanent Resident may file a petition for his or her foreign born spouse to become a permanent resident. The petition serves as a basis for the foreign-born spouse to get a “green card” – permanent residence – that allows the spouse to live permanently in the United States. To qualify to apply for a green card based on marriage, you and your spouse will need to show that you have entered into a “bona fide” marriage and that one of you is a United States citizen or permanent resident. You and your spouse must file a marriage-based petition with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by submitting a Form I-130

When filing a marriage-based immigration petition for a foreign-born spouse to live permanently in the United States, many questions may arise. This article will answer some of the most frequently asked questions. There are a few ways for a foreign-born beneficiary of a marriage-based petition to apply for a green card, including from inside the United States with USCIS, or outside the United States through a U.S. Embassy. Showing that your marriage is genuine and not just for immigration purposes is the main focus of the marriage-based petition

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